Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Ripples, Endnotes



Ripples from La Prairie Voyageur Canoes





by Jerry England
Echo Press, February 2017, Chatsworth, CA

In 2011, after researching his Passino ancestry for more than a dozen years, Jerry England made a breakthrough discovery when he learned the name had been anglicized from Pinsonneau.

In time he learned the Pinsonneau lineage in North America began in 1665, when 1,300 soldiers arrived with the Carignan-Salières Regiment in Nouvelle France (Canada) to fight the Iroquois.

His first Pinsonneau emigrant ancestor, François Pinsonneau dit Lafleur (1646-1731), was a soldier in the Saint-Ours Company of the Carignan-Salières Regiment. François arrived on the ship La Justice 14 September 1665. Further research revealed emigrant ancestors that arrived as early as 1626.

Still more research revealed a family tree filled with French-Canadian Voyageurs and Coureurs de bois. So far Jerry has documented well over a hundred French-Canadian ancestors linked to the fur trade between the 1620s and 1840s.

His voyageur ancestors traveled with Samuel de Champlain, Henri De Tonty, Pierre Gaultier de La Verendrye, Antoine de La Mothe Cadillac, Alexander Mackenzie, David Thompson and Louis and Clark as they explored and mapped the North American continent.

All came from villages in the Province of Quebec. They came from the environs Quebec, Trois-Rivières, and Montreal, but the vast majority were either born, married, or buried in La Prairie de la Magdeleine.

Return to beginning of book… http://laprairie-voyageur-canoes.blogspot.com/2017/03/ripples-introduction-contents-and.html

Index - Ripples from La Prairie Voyageur Canoes
http://laprairie-voyageur-canoes.blogspot.com/2017/03/index-ripples-from-la-prairie-voyageur.html

Note:


I decided not to have "Ripples from La Prairie Voyageur Canoes" printed because of its limited interest. 

I published it online, so it's free to all. 

I takes a little work to download and put in a text editor, but when done it is 250 pages, and prints out nicely in black and white. 


I consider my work to be  a "genealogy act of kindness." 

Enjoy,

Jerry






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